64 items found

  • moCa Cleveland | Contemporary Art | Cleveland

    ◼ Jul 16, 2021-Jan 9, 2022 +more Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. 13 LGBTQ art shows worth traveling for this spring News from NBC Out +more Cleveland artist Amber N. Ford on photography, grief and moCa residency News from ideastream +more Evolution of moCa includes making space for Cleveland artists to decide what's on the walls News from ideastream +more May 28 1PM Say It Loud: Millennial Theatre Project +more ​ Jun 2 7-9PM Screening: Robert Banks & Dexter Davis Color Me Boneface +more ​ Jun 3 2-9PM Season Shut-Down Party +more ​ FREE DAILY ADMISSION Join us for a season of art & connection through Jun. 5, 2022. FREE DAILY ADMISSION Join us for a season of art and connection through Jun. 5, 2022. Featuring work by Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo) Jerome AB J.J. Adams Aram Han Sifuentes Amber N. Ford Dana Oldfather + New exhibitions by Honey Pierre presented by Museum of Creative Human Art and Robert Banks & Dexter Davis opening Mar. 18. FREE DAILY ADMISSION Join us through June 5 to explore works by Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo) J.J. Adams Jerome AB Aram Han Sifuentes Amber N. Ford Where We Overlap presented by Museum of Creative Human Art Dana Oldfather and Robert Banks & Dexter Davis YOU'RE INVITED UPDATES About Support News Shop Rent More ◼ Exhibitions ■ Programs + Collaborations ▶ Visit

  • Season Shut Down

    About Support News Shop Rent More ◼ Exhibitions ■ Programs + Collaborations ▶ Visit 2-3PM Exhibition & Hands-On Making Free Join us for an exciting and engaging afternoon between moCa Cleveland and the Cleveland Institute of Art. Visit the Reinberger Gallery’s current exhibition We Want Everything and learn about the history of political graphics and the role radical production has played in social justice movements from around the world. The gallery has been transformed into an active printmaking workshop, complete with a communal RISO machine, button maker, and stamping station. Experience the exhibition hands-on by making a poster, a button, or stamping a bookmark. ​ Friday, June 3 Celebrate the closing of the Winter/Spring 2022 Season and kick-off PRIDE in Cleveland across 3 locations: moCa, Cleveland Institute of Art, and The Grog Shop. Sip, snack, and enjoy a night of art, film, talks, and music. Explore the season's exhibitions by Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo), J.J. Adams, Jerome AB, Aram Han Sifuentes, Dana Oldfather, Robert Banks & Dexter Davis, and the last exhibition of Museum of Creative Human Art's institutional residency with moCa: Where We Overlap . ​ 3-5PM Film Screening with Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo) ​ $15 suggested donation. Pay what you can. Proceeds go to the film's participants. ​ Celebrated artist and the second recipient of moCa’s biannual Toby’s Prize, Jade Kuriki Olivo, premieres a new film, LEXII FOXX AND ALETHIA RAEL • TRANS WOMEN AND TWO SPIRIT PEOPLE, at Cleveland Institute of Art's Peter B. Lewis Theater, followed by an audience Q+A with Kuriki Olivo and fellow artists Lexii Foxx and Alethia Rael. ​ The development of this film is one component of Kuriki Olivo’s project at moCa and highlights her commitment to the rights of Black, Indigenous, People of Color, transgender non-confirming, two-spirit+ communties. ​ 5:30PM Artist Dialogue with Jerome AB & Evelyn Burnett Free Jerome AB, whose exhibition At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing is currently at moCa, will be in conversation with Evelyn Burnett, co-founder and CEO of ThirdSpace Action Lab and Third Space Café. ​ 6:30PM Artist Talk with Jesse Hoffman Free Jesse Hoffman will share about his artistic practice and work in the exhibition Flowers in Temporary Hands , currently in moCa's Mueller Family Gallery. 8PM Performance by Kyle Kidd outside on moCa's Dock Free End your experience at moCa with Cleveland-based vocalist Kyle Kidd , who will be performing a set of new music on our loading dock. This performance will be the only performance prior to Kidd’s upcoming album release! ​ 9PM GlamGore 4th Annual Pre-PRIDE on the East Side Doors open 8PM; VIP Meet & Greet 8:30PM; Show starts at 9PM $13 Presale; $17 Door Head on over to the Grog Shop and continue the party with GlamGore 4th Annual Pre-Pride on the East Side, presented by Anhedonia Delight. ​ 11610 Euclid Ave, Cleveland At 11400 Euclid Ave, Cleveland At moCa 2785 Euclid Heights Blvd, Cleveland Heights At

  • Robert Banks and Dexter Davis: Color Me Boneface

    Robert Banks and Dexter Davis, circa 1980 About Longtime friends, Cleveland-based filmmaker Robert Banks and Cleveland-based painter Dexter Davis both embody a distinctly experimental vision, one that fosters an active exploration of the intersection between art and life. Though they work in different mediums, both Banks and Davis’s work harnesses abstraction’s potential to map personal, political, and psychological landscapes, using innovative techniques to reconstruct images. The artists grew up together in Cleveland’s Hough neighborhood and, together in the 1980s, attended the Cleveland Institute of Art. Their artistic practices and lives continued to intertwine beyond art school, resulting in a longstanding friendship firmly rooted in shared experiences, material exploration, and a profound commitment to visual storytelling. ​ Color Me Boneface is a film and exhibition project that Banks envisioned based on his belief that Davis’s impactful practice has gone largely unnoticed and is deserving of (re)discovery. Beginning in November of 2021, Banks and Davis transformed a portion of moCa’s Mueller Family Gallery into a working studio, where Banks filmed Davis creating new work; conducted interviews with him, his friends, family, and colleagues; and collaborated with students from Cleveland’s NewBridge Center for Arts and Technology to shoot, create, and edit footage shot over Davis’s lifetime into seven short films. Functioning like an expanded portrait, Banks’s films both capture the essence of Davis’s creative spirit and exemplify his own commitment to film as a physical object, revealing the incredible material beauty inherent in the medium of analog moving image. The seven short films will premiere at the Cleveland Cinematheque on June 2, 2022, followed by an in-depth conversation between the artists. ​ Guided by the spirit of collaboration, the exhibition portion of ColorMe Boneface presents a selection of Davis’s work complemented by photographs taken by NewBridge students documenting his artistic process. Mounted closely together, these photographs echo the filmstrips Banks uses in his moving image work, including the seven short films centering on Davis. The exhibition is organized in a loosely chronological fashion, beginning with Headhunter (1994), a large-scale mixed media piece that captivates visitors immediately upon entering the gallery. Moving clockwise through time, the most recently-created work featured in the exhibition, Rebecca Werner (2020), is the final touchpoint before entering the Cohen Family Gallery, which showcases footage from the Color Me Boneface films. ​ A fixture in the Cleveland arts community, Davis’s work lives in the homes of many local collectors. Works presented in this exhibition are borrowed by friends and supporters who have been following alongside Davis’s artistic journey. This element of the project reiterates the ways in which strong relationships undergird both Banks and Davis’s practices. At every level, Color Me Boneface reminds us of the power in embracing curiosity, criticality, and complexity, not just in visual culture, but in our friendship and kinship circles as well. ​ Robert Banks & Dexter Davis: Color Me Boneface Where Mueller Family Gallery Cohen Family Gallery When Mar 18-Jun 5, 2022 Robert Banks and Dexter Davis, Color Me Boneface, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Robert Banks and Dexter Davis, Color Me Boneface, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Robert Banks and Dexter Davis, Color Me Boneface, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Robert Banks and Dexter Davis, Color Me Boneface, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Robert Banks and Dexter Davis, Color Me Boneface, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Out of gallery

  • J.J. Adams-Flowers In Temporary Hands

    J.J. Adams, Booker (by the creek) , 1959. Courtesy the artist's family archives About J.J. Adams’s Flowers In Temporary Hands explores the role that privilege and race play into an assemblage of any one identity. With four distinct iterations–an artist book , video performance, sound, and sculptural landscape–Flowers In Temporary Hands abstractly layers images as language, culling from a steeply personal and concealed post generational memory. Through a staircased soundscape, the audience is guided into a layered installation of images mounted on a labyrinthine chain-link fence, an echo of the artist’s most significant detainment as a teenage child. Flowers In Temporary Hands addresses legacy through photographs from Adams’s estranged grandfather’s archive, pages from Adams’s teenage journal while institutionalized, and newly produced poems that reflect on the artist’s past state of mind. All come together to reveal a striking but not uncommon portrait of a boy whose narrative of self has been mostly shaped by their single white mother. A series of tender gestures paired with visceral critical inquiry, Flowers In Temporary Hands reminds us that identity, just like history, is both contingent and incomplete. This series of stories has been built from a myriad of people, places, and moments in time. ​ About the book J.J. Adams’s first publication, Flowers In Temporary Hands , pairs images with language to establish a symbolic universe that mixes personal memory, loss, and desire. Composed of three sections that address different periods in the artist’s life, Flowers in Temporary Hands acts as a timestamp to closure. ​ In The Toothpaste Diaries , Adams shares pages of their journal: a collection of drawings, collages, and writing created during a defining moment of teenage incarceration. These richly layered pieces are juxtaposed with works from the Gregory Adams Archive. This collection of black and white photographs taken by the artist’s estranged grandfather document his own collegial life, from the playing field to the classroom. Poignantly capturing two distinct moments in time, The Toothpaste Diaries and the Gregory Adams Archive are threaded together by Boys Like Us: Part One , a series of formatted and densely layered poems that reflect on J.J. Adams’s past and the construction of family vs. identity. ​ About the artist Jesse Hoffman (b. 1989, San Francisco, CA) is an interdisciplinary artist based in Los Angeles, CA. Hoffman’s practice is rooted in the examination of the transitional passages of self-acceptance, belonging, and image over time. With a background in performance, still life photography, and commercial set design, Hoffman uses the archive, the object, and the portrait as form. Hoffman’s work lays bare the complication inherent in identity, emphasizing the poignant resilience and fugue in image/world making. ​ Bring home an edition of Flowers In Temporary Hands +More at themocastore.com . ​ J.J. Adams’s Flowers in Temporary Hands is organized by Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo) as part of Toby’s Prize, a biennial award made possible by Toby Devan Lewis. ​ ​ J.J. Adams: Flowers In Temporary Hands Where Mueller Family Gallery When Jan 28-Jun 5, 2022 Gregory Adams Archive, 1958-1962/2021. Digital c-print on aluminum. Installation view, J.J. Adams, Flowers In Temporary Hands, moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio Consider Leaves/Boys Like Us, 2021. Digital c-print on aluminum, 24 x 36 in (60.96 x 91.44 cm). Installation view, J.J. Adams, Flowers In Temporary Hands, moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio Toothpaste Diaries, 2005/2021. Digital c-prints on aluminum. Dimensions variable. Installation view, J.J. Adams, Flowers In Temporary Hands, moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio Julie, 2006. Digital c-print, 8 x 10 in (20.32 x 25.4 cm). Installation view, J.J. Adams, Flowers In Temporary Hands, moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio METADATA pillow stuffed by Jesse, 2007. Artist-owned clothes, vinyl, and cotton. Dimensions variable. Installation view, J.J. Adams, Flowers In Temporary Hands, moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio Out of gallery

  • Dana Oldfather-Flyfall

    Dana Oldfather, Flyfall , 2022 (detail). Drawing, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist About Luminous and dreamlike, Dana Oldfather’s paintings depict an imagined view of the world, one that prompts an introspective look at the layers and language of the human experience. Her portrayal of women engaged in everyday actions and tasks–climbing, swinging, stumbling, sneezing, loading the washing machine–merge current events, art history, folktales, and personal experience to evoke the emotional complexities of real life situations. In Flyfall (2022), a site-responsive drawing for moCa’s Kohl Atrium, a series of female characters are intertwined with a flock of Canadian geese. Rising up the three-story wall, the hybrid creatures appear to be simultaneously flying and falling. Both resilient and defeated, free and tethered, the figures capture the inherent tension of “fight or flight”—the term for our automatic physiological reaction to an event that is perceived as mentally or physically frightening, the response that prepares us to fight or flee. ​ About the artist The richly imagined scenario in Flyfall and the range of possible interpretations that rise to its surface offer a reminder that our present moment is distinguished by a prevailing condition of groundlessness and uncertainty. Are the women and the geese fighting or are they working together? Are they separate entities or a hybrid form? What and how are they feeling as they wrestle together? By embracing ambiguity, Oldfather reminds us that teetering off the edge can mean both the brink of collapse and the steadying of one’s step before taking flight. Both flying and falling are possible, but how we decide to interpret the story is up to us. Dana Oldfather currently works and lives just outside in Cleveland, Ohio. Her work has been presented at the Library Street Collective, Detroit, MI; Zg Gallery, Chicago, IL; Kathryn Markel Fine Art, New York; Red Arrow Gallery, Nashville, TN; Museum of Contemporary Cleveland; The McDonough Museum of Art in Youngstown, Youngstown, Ohio; The Carnegie Center for Art and History, New Albany, IN; and the University of Southern Queensland, Australia. She is the recipient of the William and Dorothy Yeck Award for Young Painters, two Ohio Arts Council Individual Excellence Awards, and a Satellite Fund Emergency Relief Grant from SPACES Gallery, The Warhol Foundation, and The Cleveland Foundation. Her work has been published in Beautiful/Decay, ArtMaze Magazine, and The Art of Spray by Lori Zimmer. ​ Major support for Dana Oldfather’s Flyfall is provided by Joanne Cohen & Morris Wheeler. ​ ​ Dana Oldfather: Flyfall Where Kohl Atrium When Jan 28-Jun 5, 2022 Dana Oldfather, Flyfall, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Dana Oldfather, Flyfall, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Dana Oldfather, Flyfall, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Dana Oldfather, Flyfall, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Dana Oldfather, Flyfall, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Dana Oldfather, Flyfall, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Out of gallery

  • Aram Han Sifuentes-Who Was This Meant To Protect?

    Aram Han Sifuentes, U.S. Citizenship Test Sampler (Made by non-citizens who live and work in the U.S.) , 2013-ongoing. Installation view. Cotton thread, sequins, beads, photo transfers, patches, felt, yarn on linen,11 x 8.5 in each (27.94 x 21.59 cm). Courtesy the artist. Photo by Hyounsang Yoo About As an immigrant and daughter of a seamstress, Korean American artist Aram Han Sifuentes (she/they) uses sewing as a medium to investigate citizenship, protest, and belonging in the United States. With a practice rooted in the collective, her work is used to center disenfranchised communities, particularly dispossessed immigrants of color. Who Was This Built to Protect? developed over the course of Getting to Know Aram Han Sifuentes, the artist’s long-term, long-distance residency with moCa. It centers around a set of six large-scale red silk curtains with white text that spans the museum’s Gund Commons. These curtains, entitled Messages to Authorities (Go Away!) (2021), are modeled after Red Cards created by the Immigrant Legal Resource Center with language that outlines the rights and protections held by all people under the U.S. Constitution, regardless of immigration status. Underscoring how language can act as a barrier to citizenship, Who Was This Built to Protect? places Messages to Authorities (Go Away!) directly in conversation with the U.S. Naturalization Test questions through a selection of U.S. Citizenship Test Samplers (2012-ongoing), needlework samplers of U.S. Naturalization Test questions and answers made by U.S. non-citizens during artist-facilitated workshops. Han Sifuentes repeats these questions on moCa’s Kohl Monumental Staircase, a game of one step forward, two steps back to test civic knowledge and illustrate the often-performative labor non-citizens must endure to prove their worth. An unflinching critique of U.S. governmental practices, Who Was This Built to Protect? highlights roadblocks on the path to citizenship and encourages audiences to question bureaucratic systems, those who constructed the systems, and for whom the systems are designed to benefit. ​ About the artist Aram Han Sifuentes (b. 1986, Seoul, South Korea) is a fiber, social practice, and performance artist who works to claim spaces for immigrant and disenfranchised communities. Her work often revolves around skill sharing, specifically sewing techniques, to create multiethnic and intergenerational sewing circles, which become a place for empowerment, subversion and protest. Han Sifuentes earned her B.A. in Art and Latin American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, and her M.F.A. in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has been a recipient of a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship, Map Fund, Asian Cultural Council’s Individual Fellowship, 3Arts Award, and 3Arts Next Level/Spare Room Award. Her project, Protest Banner Lending Library, was a finalist for the Beazley Design Awards at the Design Museum in London in 2016. The artist’s work has been exhibited at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago Cultural Center, Asian Arts Initiative, Chung Young Yang Embroidery Museum, and the Design Museum. Aram is the inaugural artist in moCa’s Getting to Know You residency and an Adjunct Associate Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. ​ Major support for Aram Han Sifuentes’s Who Was This Built To Protect? i s provided by Joanne Cohen & Morris Wheeler. ​ Aram Han Sifuentes: Who Was This Built to Protect? Where Gund Commons, Kohl Monumental Stair, and Elevator When Jan 28-Jun 5, 2022 Aram Han Sifuentes, Who Was This Built To Protect?, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Aram Han Sifuentes, Who Was This Built To Protect?, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Aram Han Sifuentes, Who Was This Built To Protect?, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Aram Han Sifuentes, Who Was This Built To Protect?, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Aram Han Sifuentes, Who Was This Built To Protect?, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Out of gallery

  • Jerome AB

    Jerome AB, At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing , 2021 (still). HD Video, Color, Sound, 9 min. Courtesy the artist. About Jerome AB’s At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing (2021) is a mixed-media installation, movement video, and soundscape. A case study in surrender, the work consists of an artifact, once buried beneath compounded terrain, now displayed within the museum walls. Its provenance unaccounted for, the 12’ high metal structure operates like a time capsule, nestled in excavated ground. Inside the enclosure is a three-dimensional video file, attempting to relay a psychological unraveling captured in real time. Past glitches of lapsed memories, the video’s subject comes to a road diverged. In one instance, we can choose to find comfort in the cards we have been dealt, to live life on life’s terms. In another, our circumstances can feel like they are closing in on us, with the only option left to fight. What starts as one figure, splits, and fragm ents into a multiplicity of being. At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing explores the existence of two seemingly opposing truths that can co-exist as one reality. Set to a deteriorating meditative score, a self-help spiral featuring multi-instrumentalists Eartheater and Jasminfire, AB’s At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing explores what it means to relinquish control and to find courage in faith. ​ About the artist Jerome AB (b. 1991, Nairobi, Kenya) is a multidisciplinary artist and creative director based in Los Angeles, CA. Trained as an architect actualized through dance, his work is a translation of movement architecture and spatial choreography. AB’s performance pieces, films, installations, and sonic sculptures are all rooted in creating worlds that represent physical manifestations of psychological landscapes. Reoccurring motifs of exploration include queer futures, ancestral connection, healthy masculinity, and the occasional internet purge. AB has created work for and alongside artists such as Blood Orange, Bobbi Salvor Menuez, Kanye West, Caroline Polachek, Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo), poet Precious Okoyomon, photographers Paul Sepuya and Michael Bailey-Gates, filmmaker Alima Lee, and Brooklyn-based dance duo FlucT. His work has been featured at institutions such as MoMA PS1, LACMA, National Sawdust, Knockdown Center, Navel, and Lever House as commissioned by Performa. ​ Jerome AB’s At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing is organized by Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo) as part of Toby’s Prize, a biennial award made possible by Toby Devan Lewis. ​ ​ Jerome AB: At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing Where Mueller Family Gallery When Jan 28-Jun 5, 2022 Jerome AB, At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Jerome AB, At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Jerome AB, At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Jerome AB, At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Jerome AB, At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing, 2022. Installation view at moCa Cleveland. Photo: Field Studio Out of gallery

  • Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo)

    About Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo) is the second recipient of moCa’s biannual Toby’s Prize. Named after philanthropist Toby Devan Lewis—one of moCa’s long-standing Board members—the prize supports the artistic practices of five artists over a 10-year period. Puppies Puppies’s early conceptual works were created under a pseudonym that avoided specificity of gender, origin, and individualism. Beginning in 2018, the artist embarked on a new series of work that coincided with the beginning of her transition to Jade Kuriki Olivo. Throughout her multilayered practice is a commitment to the rights of Black, Indigenous, People of Color, transgender, gender non-conforming, two-spirit+ communities. The artist is the first to share the Toby’s Prize experience, inviting artists Jerome AB and J.J. Adams to create new works for two simultaneous solo exhibitions opening in January 2022. Her project at moCa also includes the development of a new film and the creation of her first publication, published in collaboration with Remai Modern in Saskatoon, Canada, and Kunsthaus Glarus in Switzerland. ​ Toby's Prize is generously supported by Toby Devan Lewis. ​ Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo), One year performing outside (Stonewall)(protests) 2020-2021. Courtesy the artist Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo) Where Mueller Family Gallery When Jan 28-Jun 5, 2022 Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo). Installation view at moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo). Installation view at moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo). Installation view at moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo). Installation view at moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo). Installation view at moCa Cleveland, 2022. Photo: Field Studio Out of gallery

  • ◼  Exhibitions

    Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo) ​ Jerome AB: At Once Terrifying and Equally Freeing J.J. Adams: Flowers in Temporary Hands Aram Han Sifuentes: Who Was This Built to Protect? Dana Oldfather: Flyfall Robert Banks & Dexter Davis: Color Me Boneface Where We Overlap presented by Museum of Creative Human Art Current Jan. 28-Jun. 5, 2022 Future Past Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. ​ Joyce Morrow Jones Black Butterfly Terry Joshua The Pinkest Hue presented by Museum of Creative Human Art The National AIDS Memorial Quilt ​ Lawrence Baker Taking Another Look presented by Museum of Creative Human Art ​ Stina Aleah Helping Hands presented by Museum of Creative Human Art AAWFUL AARON Exhibition title presented by Museum of Creative Human Art Imagine Otherwise Where We Overlap presented by Museum of Creative Human Art ◼ Exhibitions ■ Programs + Collaborations ▶ Visit Open site navigation About Support News Shop Rent More Exhibitions Artists explore and reveal the world around us. From personal revelations to universal ties, you are invited to connect with the art of now.

  • J.J. Adams Flowers In Temporary Hands

    J.J. Adams, Booker (by the creek) , 1959. Courtesy the artist's family archives About J.J. Adams’s Flowers In Temporary Hands explores the role that privilege and race play into an assemblage of any one identity. With four distinct iterations–an artist book , video performance, sound, and sculptural landscape–Flowers In Temporary Hands abstractly layers images as language, culling from a steeply personal and concealed post generational memory. Through a staircased soundscape, the audience is guided into a layered installation of images mounted on a labyrinthine chain-link fence, an echo of the artist’s most significant detainment as a teenage child. Flowers In Temporary Hands addresses legacy through photographs from Adams’s estranged grandfather’s archive, pages from Adams’s teenage journal while institutionalized, and newly produced poems that reflect on the artist’s past state of mind. All come together to reveal a striking but not uncommon portrait of a boy whose narrative of self has been mostly shaped by their single white mother. A series of tender gestures paired with visceral critical inquiry, Flowers In Temporary Hands reminds us that identity, just like history, is both contingent and incomplete. This series of stories has been built from a myriad of people, places, and moments in time. ​ About the book J.J. Adams’s first publication, Flowers In Temporary Hands , pairs images with language to establish a symbolic universe that mixes personal memory, loss, and desire. Composed of three sections that address different periods in the artist’s life, Flowers in Temporary Hands acts as a timestamp to closure. ​ In The Toothpaste Diaries , Adams shares pages of their journal: a collection of drawings, collages, and writing created during a defining moment of teenage incarceration. These richly layered pieces are juxtaposed with works from the Gregory Adams Archive. This collection of black and white photographs taken by the artist’s estranged grandfather document his own collegial life, from the playing field to the classroom. Poignantly capturing two distinct moments in time, The Toothpaste Diaries and the Gregory Adams Archive are threaded together by Boys Like Us: Part One , a series of formatted and densely layered poems that reflect on J.J. Adams’s past and the construction of family vs. identity. ​ Presented together for the first time in this intimate publication, the three bodies of work create a coexistence of time, operating as a tender portrait of 2 archives that continue to unfold. J.J. Adams is a collaboration between artist Jesse Hoffman and his grandfather, Gregory Adams’s archive. Flowers In Temporary Hands is published alongside J.J. Adams’s exhibition of the same name at moCa Cleveland, running from January 28–June 5, 2022. ​ About the artist Jesse Hoffman (b. 1989, San Francisco, CA) is an interdisciplinary artist based in Los Angeles, CA. Hoffman’s practice is rooted in the examination of the transitional passages of self-acceptance, belonging, and image over time. With a background in performance, still life photography, and commercial set design, Hoffman uses the archive, the object, and the portrait as form. Hoffman’s work lays bare the complication inherent in identity, emphasizing the poignant resilience and fugue in image/world making. ​ Bring home an edition of Flowers In Temporary Hands +More at themocastore.com . ​ J.J. Adams’s Flowers in Temporary Hands is organized by Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo) as part of Toby’s Prize, a biennial award made possible by Toby Devan Lewis . ​ J.J. Adams: Flowers in Temporary Hands Where Mueller Family Gallery & Interior Stair When Jan 28-Jun 5, 2022

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Cleveland, OH 44106

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